frameworks and apache question

hello all -

my regular readers know i have been looking at different frameworks. I have been using Node.js with some success, and have briefly looked at ruby-on-rails. Just a week ago i discovered Laravel which also looks promising.

my question: every one of these seems to have its own internal server in order to work. does using this approach replace apache or make apache obsolete? i considered late one night temporarily taking apache down to see if that makes any difference but i strongly suspect it does not.

i saw the word "proxy" thrown around from what little research i did to make these new frameworks coexist with apache.
 
from what little i know, i get the feeling that maybe we still need apache to hand off the request to the appropriate server. maybe apache just adds the new port number to the URL ?

in other words, if i had the domain name, i can set it up like so:

http://interServerIsAwesome.com/marksFrameworkTest ==> http://interServerIsAwesome.com:1234

where marksFrameworkTest is really the name of my framework server running on port 1234.

maybe this is just as simple as going into the .htaccess file and setting it.

i have no idea if all the frameworks use this approach or not.
 
hmmm i feel like i am talking to myself now!

another contender: meteor.js - javascript on the server and the client. it looks VERY powerful.

i am thinking some combination of laravel with angularJS, combined with meteor.js assuming i can learn them all!
 

Joe Huss

Administrator
Staff member
Node.js i think provides its own server, with Lavavel and most other PHP frameworks working usually off another webserver like apache, but many php frameworks can also run their own webserver, but using apache or a real webserver is probably better/faster, with the possible exception of HHVM .

I like Laravel, Yii, Phalcon, and Symphony from what ive seen of them , but mostly dont use any frameworks, although I'm trying to start using them more.

Angular looks really neat but id worry about how search engines index something that isnt really html until the browser renders it w/ javascript. That being said, I do want to use Angular, it does look pretty bad-ass.
 
from what i read, google is throwing its weight behind angularJS which is quite an endorsement.

node.js is its own server. you can write a 20 second three-liner 'hello-world' to demonstrate.

of course, all of these frameworks have a learning curve, sadly enough. and i find all the learning curves are all steep.

regarding SEO, i had the impression they ignored all the jScript along with image sizes... what do you think? IMHO the engines would ignore the dynamic parts of the webpage.
 
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I think this OS is providing its own server. Personally I have used Apache a lot and it is still my favored method / server to use.
 
Node.js i think provides its own server, with Lavavel and most other PHP frameworks working usually off another webserver like apache, but many php frameworks can also run their own webserver, but using apache or a real webserver is probably better/faster, with the possible exception of HHVM .

joe - in order to run a laravel app, you have to start some sort of internal server. i have not tried running it yet, but i get the impression it runs independent of apache. it would be interesting to start a laravel app and then temporarily stop apache.

i have only read the intro book six times, you would think i would know this stuff by now !

Angular looks really neat but id worry about how search engines index something that isnt really html until the browser renders it w/ javascript. That being said, I do want to use Angular, it does look pretty bad-ass.

since the all-mighty-and-powerful google has thrown its weight behind angularJS, i dont think we need be coo concerned about SEO !
 

TDev

New Member
Node.js i think provides its own server, with Lavavel and most other PHP frameworks working usually off another webserver like apache, but many php frameworks can also run their own webserver, but using apache or a real webserver is probably better/faster, with the possible exception of HHVM .

I like Laravel, Yii, Phalcon, and Symphony from what ive seen of them , but mostly dont use any frameworks, although I'm trying to start using them more.

Angular looks really neat but id worry about how search engines index something that isnt really html until the browser renders it w/ javascript. That being said, I do want to use Angular, it does look pretty bad-ass.

I really like AngularJS, particularly the data-binding and directives features. However, as you mention, search engine indexing is a problem. It seems that, as of right now, the best solution is to use a third-party service as prerender.io if you don't want to roll your own solution with PhantomJS such as the one mentioned here.
 
dumb question, but why is SEO a concern? i should think that since google is solidly behind angularJS this would not be an issue.

also, it seems to me (in my limited way of thinking) that you would not be usin something like angularJS on a home page but rather on a SPA (single-page-application) webpage where you would not care about indexing anyways.

thoughts?
 

TDev

New Member
No, you can use Angular (and similar JS MVC frameworks such as Backbone and Ember) to build pretty complex applications. You can find some applications built with Angular here: https://builtwith.angularjs.org/ If you browse the examples, you'll find several apps where SEO makes sense.
 
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