what are the Types of office 365 migration?

There are four Office 365 migration types for you to consider.

1. Staged Migration
An Office 365 staged migration moves everything over in batches. It transitions all of your resource mailboxes and existing users from Exchange 2003 or 2007 to Exchange Online.

It’s a great method for medium-sized companies (especially those with over 2,000 mailboxes) that are currently using on-premises Microsoft Exchange 2003 or 2007. It is not, unfortunately, available for organizations using Exchange 2010 or 2013.

A staged migration moves mailboxes in batches over a determined period. It requires the use of the Directory Synchronization tool, which replicates your accounts from the on-premises Active Directory database. By the end of the process, all mailboxes will be hosted in Office 365.

During the migration, Office 365 users will still have the ability to send and receive emails from users that haven’t migrated over yet. The only resources users won’t be able to access are calendars and delegates.

2. Cutover Migration
A cutover migration is an immediate transition from an on-premises Exchange system to Office 365. All your resources are migrated at once, including mailboxes, contacts and distribution groups. With this migration, you cannot select specific objects to migrate, and once the move is complete, everyone will have an Office 365 account.

This Office 365 migration method is best if you’re currently using Exchange 2003, 2007, 2010 or 2013 and have less than 2,000 mailboxes. In fact, Microsoft recommends the cutover migration for companies with less than 150 users to the amount of time it takes to migrate so many accounts.

One thing to note: every user’s Outlook profile will need to be reconfigured to connect to Office 365.

3. Hybrid Migration
The Office 365 hybrid migration allows you to integrate Office 365 with your on-premises Exchange servers and your existing directory services. As a result, you can synchronize and manage user accounts for both environments.

With a hybrid migration, you’re able to move mailboxes in and out of Exchange Online. You can even pick and choose which mailboxes to keep on-premises and which to migrate to Office 365. Plus, you can synchronize passwords and introduce single sign-on to your team to make it easier to log in to both environments.

If you’d like to use a hybrid migration, you need more than 2,000 mailboxes. It’s also necessary to have Exchange 2010 or later. If you don’t, you must install at least one on-premises Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2010 Service Pack 3 (SP3) server to enable hybrid deployment connectivity.

4. IMAP Migration
While the other three Office 365 migration types depend solely on Exchange, an IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol) migration allows you to transition users from Gmail or any other email system that supports IMAP migration.

An IMAP migration pulls information from your source mailboxes and hands it over to Office 365. However, IMAP migration doesn’t transition anything other than email. Calendar items, tasks and contacts all stay in the original inbox and have to be migrated manually by the user.

You’ll also have to create a mailbox for each user before initiating the email migration – something other migration types automatically create for you.

IMAP migrations have a limit of 50,000 total mailboxes and 5,000,000 items. And once the migration is complete, any new mail sent to the original mailbox won’t be migrated.

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tony_maguire

New Member
Migration methods

These are various email migration methods that you might want to consider.

CUTOVER MIGRATION
A cutover migration migrates all existing mailboxes, contacts, and distribution groups from an on-premises Microsoft Exchange system to Office 365.

This type of migration is performed as a single batch move that includes all of your mailboxes, contacts, and distribution group objects. There’s no option to migrate objects selectively. After the migration is complete, every user that has an on-premises Exchange mailbox also has an Office 365 account.

When to choose a cutover migration

You might want to choose a cutover migration when the following conditions are met:

The current on-premises Exchange environment is Exchange 2003, 2007, 2010, or 2013.
The current on-premises Exchange environment has less than 2,000 mailboxes.
Note: According to Microsoft, “Even though cutover migration supports moving up to 2000 mailboxes, due to the length of time it takes to create and migrate 2000 users, it is more reasonable to migrate 150 users or less.” Source: What you need to know about a cutover email migration to Office 365

Impact

The main logistical challenge with cutover migration is the need to reconfigure every user’s Outlook profile to connect to Office 365.

STAGED MIGRATION
A staged migration migrates all existing users and resource mailboxes from on-premises Exchange 2003 and Exchange 2007 organizations to Exchange Online.

This migration method moves mailboxes to Office 365 over a period of time. When the process is complete, all mailboxes are hosted in Office 365. This option is suitable for medium-sized organizations.

When to choose a staged migration

You might want to choose a staged migration when the following condition is met:

The source email system is Microsoft Exchange 2003 or 2007.
Note: Staged migration isn’t available for organizations with Microsoft Exchange 2010 or 2013. Use cutover or hybrid migration for these versions.

The key requirement for staged migration is the Directory Synchronization tool. This tool replicates user accounts from your on-premises Active Directory database and adds them to the Office 365 organization.

With a staged migration, mailboxes are moved in batches over a period of time so that there’s a simple, high level of coexistence during the migration. Users who have mailboxes in Office 365 can send and receive emails from on-premises users, and vice-versa. They can see each other in the Global Address List (GAL), but they can’t share calendar availability information or access delegates.

HYBRID MIGRATION
With a hybrid deployment, you can integrate Office 365 with your on-premises Exchange servers, and also with the existing directory services. This functionality facilitates the synchronization and management of user accounts for both environments.

Hybrid deployments provide rich features

A hybrid configuration wizard establishes federation and connectors between an on-premises Exchange environment and an Office 365 tenant.

With hybrid deployments, mailboxes can be natively moved in and out of Exchange Online. It’s also possible to keep some mailboxes on-premises and some on Office 365.

You can also add password synchronization or single sign-on (SSO) so that users can log on to both the environments with their on-premises credentials.

When to choose hybrid deployments

You might want to choose a hybrid migration when the following condition is met:

The source email system is Exchange 2010 or later.
Note: If your on-premises Exchange organization is running Exchange 2007 or 2003 and you want to connect your organization to Office 365, you must install at least one on-premises Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2010 Service Pack 3 (SP3) server. This server is used for hybrid deployment connectivity, which seamlessly connects your on-premises Exchange and Exchange Online organizations.

To avoid the additional cost of an Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2010 SP3 server license, check to see if you qualify for a free Hybrid Edition product key for Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2010 SP3.

IMAP MIGRATION
Staged, cutover, and hybrid migrations use Outlook Anywhere or Exchange Web Services (EWS) to connect to Office 365. However, customers who aren’t using Microsoft Exchange servers aren’t able to use Outlook Anywhere or EWS.

If you’re one of them, you can use a different migration method, such as Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP). IMAP extracts information from your source mailboxes and then pushes it to Office 365.

However, IMAP migrations are limited. For example, while the process migrates mail items, it doesn’t migrate calendar, contacts, notes, or other item types. There’s also a limit of 5,000,000 items and 50,000 total mailboxes.
 

lewisbert103

New Member
There are 4 different types of Office 365 Migration Types
There are four Office 365 migration types for you to consider.

1. Staged Migration
An Office 365 staged migration moves everything over in batches. It transitions all of your resource mailboxes and existing users from Exchange 2003 or 2007 to Exchange Online.
It’s a great method for medium-sized companies (especially those with over 2,000 mailboxes) that are currently using on-premises Microsoft Exchange 2003 or 2007. It is not, unfortunately, available for organizations using Exchange 2010 or 2013.
A staged migration moves mailboxes in batches over a determined period. It requires the use of the Directory Synchronization tool, which replicates your accounts from the on-premises Active Directory database. By the end of the process, all mailboxes will be hosted in Office 365.
During the migration, Office 365 users will still have the ability to send and receive emails from users that haven’t migrated over yet. The only resources users won’t be able to access are calendars and delegates.

2. Cutover Migration
A cutover migration is an immediate transition from an on-premises Exchange system to Office 365. All your resources are migrated at once, including mailboxes, contacts and distribution groups. With this migration, you cannot select specific objects to migrate, and once the move is complete, everyone will have an Office 365 account.
This Office 365 migration method is best if you’re currently using Exchange 2003, 2007, 2010 or 2013 and have less than 2,000 mailboxes. In fact, Microsoft recommends the cutover migration for companies with less than 150 users to the amount of time it takes to migrate so many accounts.
One thing to note: every user’s Outlook profile will need to be reconfigured to connect to Office 365.

3. Hybrid Migration
The Office 365 hybrid migration allows you to integrate Office 365 with your on-premises Exchange servers and your existing directory services. As a result, you can synchronize and manage user accounts for both environments.
With a hybrid migration, you’re able to move mailboxes in and out of Exchange Online. You can even pick and choose which mailboxes to keep on-premises and which to migrate to Office 365. Plus, you can synchronize passwords and introduce single sign-on to your team to make it easier to log in to both environments.

4. IMAP Migration
While the other three Office 365 migration types depend solely on Exchange, an IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol) migration allows you to transition users from Gmail or any other email system that supports IMAP migration.
An IMAP migration pulls information from your source mailboxes and hands it over to Office 365. However, IMAP migration doesn’t transition anything other than email. Calendar items, tasks and contacts all stay in the original inbox and have to be migrated manually by the user.
IMAP migrations have a limit of 50,000 total mailboxes and 5,000,000 items. And once the migration is complete, any new mail sent to the original mailbox won’t be migrated.

I hope this is helpful!
Lewis Bert
 
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